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Jerry SamuelJerry Samuel
Navajo

Jerry Samuel was born into the Navajo Nation in 1959. He began his interest in creating these unique dolls by watching his sister, Cheryl Yazza, craft her dolls in early 1998.

Jerry handcrafts these beautiful one of a kind, Southwestern Indian porcelain dolls from scratch to finish, along with the help of his wife, Victoria Samuel, and his son Cooper Samuel. Jerry creates these unique dolls with enthusiasm and in anticipation of attracting all types of doll collectors. His dolls are designed with fox fur, bobcat, badger, or wolf pelts. The clothing resembles the clothes worn by Northern and Plains Indian Tribes. The facial design represent spirits of various Navajo Ceremonial Dieties, while the colors represents the clans of the Navajo. The attire also tell stories such as the fox head representing spirits of animals for hunting purposes. Jerry is of the Bitah’nii Clan. He obtained his artistic ability from his family who are also artisans. Jerry proudly signs his dolls as: J-Samuel below the left ear.

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-None to date

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Russell SanchezRussell Sanchez
San Ildefonso

Russell Sanchez is a full blooded Native American Indian born in July of 1966 into the San Ildefonso Pueblo. Pueblo children are seldom taught to make pottery, they learn by watching and experimenting with clay on their own. However, Russell was inspired and encouraged to learn the art of pottery making from his aunt, Rose Gonzales, as a young child at the age of twelve. He was also inspired by another famous potter by the name of Dora Tse-Pe’, who encouraged Russell to continue the long lived tradition of constructing vessels from nature’s gifts. He observed her with a careful eye and eventually developed his own techniques and styles. He eventually adopted techniques with the use of inlayed turquoise and heishi beads. He also was influenced by Jody Folwell, who introduced him into using different colors of clays and slips on the same vessels.

Russell specializes in a wide variety of contemporary pottery such as: redware, blackware, micaceous, green clay jars, and figurines. He is a definite outdoorsman and gets most of his inspiration from mother nature. He enjoys hiking around the San Ildefonso Pueblo hills and deserts.

Awards:

-1979 Best of Class Santa Fe Indian Market
-1981 Best of Division Santa Fe Indian Market
-1988 Non-Traditional Figures Santa Fe Indian Market
-1990 Non-Traditional 2nd Place Santa Fe Indian Market
-1992 Non-Traditional 1st Place Santa Fe Indian Market
-1994 Non-Traditional 1st Place Santa Fe Indian Market
-1998 Non-Traditional 1st Place Santa Fe Indian Market
-Several Others too numerous to list

Publications:

- Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

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Dory SandiaDory Sandia
Jemez

Dory Sandia is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1968 into the Jemez Pueblo. He is a member of the Pumpkin Clan. He learned the traditional way of hand coiling pottery from his mother, Sharon Sarracino. Sharon taught Dory all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using the ancient traditional methods which were passed down to her from her ancestors before her. The lucrative aspect of the business played a key role in Dory’s decision to become an artist, and also to continue the long lived tradition of his people.

Dory specializes in hand coiled and hand painted contemporary two-toned, hand polished pottery bowls, plates, and wedding vases. Dory gathers his natural clays, and harvests his natural plants from within the Jemez Pueblo. He breaks down the clumps of clay into a fine powder and hand mixes the powder with sand to temper the clay. He begins the hand coiling process by rolling the clay into snake like coils and builds the vessels to his desired shape. He sets his pieces out to dry and when they are fully dried he sands them down for a smooth finish, then, the vessels are ready for painting and polishing. He hand paints flowers, kiva steps, geometric patterns, corn symbols, and sunfaces, which symbolizes prosperity. Finally, he fires his pottery in a kiln after he stone polishes the desired areas. Dory signs his pottery as: Dory Sandia/Jemez, N.M. He is related to: Johnny Sandia (father), Sharon Sarracino (mother), Margaret Sarracino (grandmother), Frank Sarracino (grandfather), Renee Sandia (sister), Adrian Sandia, and Ben Sandia (brothers).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
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Geraldine F. SandiaGeraldine F. Sandia
Jemez

Geraldine F. Sandia is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1950. Geraldine began experimenting with clay at the age of 10. She was inspired to learn and continue the long lived tradition of working with clay from her mother, Cecilia Loretto. Cecilia taught Geraldine all the fundamentals and shared with her all the special techniques of a master pottery artist. The lucrative aspect of the business was also inspiration for her to become an artist.

Geraldine specializes in handmade, hand painted two toned polychrome, stone polished traditional Jemez pottery. She gathers her clay from within the hills of the Jemez Pueblo. She breaks the clumps of clay down to a fine powder form and mixes with water and other natural pigments. Then, Geraldine begins forming the clay to the desired shape and size by the hand coiling method. Once the pot is dry she sands her formed pottery to the desired weight. She hand paints patterns of feathers and geometric designs among many other patterns. She fires her pottery outdoors, the traditional way of her ancestors. She is related to the following artists: Caroline G. Loretto, Mary H. Loretto (sisters), Florence Aragon , Rachael Aragon (aunts), Natalie Sandia, Rachael Sandia, and Jocelyn Sandia (daughters). She signs her pottery as: G. Sandia, Jemez.

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market consecutively since 1980
-Heard Museum 1st, 2nd & 3rd since 1980

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

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Caroline SandoCaroline Sando
Jemez

Caroline Sando, “Peacock Feathers”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1963 into the Jemez Pueblo. She was inspired to learn the art of pottery making
by her Grandmother, Andrea Tsosie. Andrea taught Caroline all the fundamentals of working with clay and using ancient traditional methods. She began experimenting with pottery in 1971 at the age of 8. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key roll in her becoming an artisan.

Caroline specializes in Jemez Pueblo style storytellers. She uses all natural clays and natural paints to hand make her storytellers. Caroline gathers her own clay from the sacred grounds within the Jemez Pueblo. Then, she cleans, mixes, shapes, paints and fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with cedar wood chips. She accents her dolls with turquoise stones to give them more of a traditional look. Her favorite ones to make are 20” or taller, because she likes the challenge of adding more detail and more children. Caroline signs her pottery as: Caroline Sando, Jemez.

Caroline is related to the following artists: Irene Herrera (mother) and Andrea Tsosie (grandmother).

Awards:

- Santa Fe Indian Market
- Pueblo Grande Museum Show

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

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Kenneth James SandoKenneth James Sando
Jemez

Kenneth James Sando, “Christmas Deer”, was born in 1963 into the Jemez Pueblo. He was artistically inspired to become an artist by Gabriel Cajero and Don Chinina whom are his closest friends. They taught Kenny all the fundamentals of pottery making the traditional way.

Kenny mainly specializes in the finest authentic hand-made storytellers. However, he will hand-coil pottery from time to time. He gathers all his materials from within the Jemez Pueblo. He cleans, mixes, shapes, sands, paints, and fires his own work. According to Kenny, it’s a very long and difficult process. It takes him about a week of non-stop effort to construct one of his masterpieces from start to finish. Kenny also hand coils corn maidens, clowns, bears, and turtles. Kenny enjoys making his clay sculptures the best. He likes the challenge of designing his own style of art.

Kenny is related to Wilma Gachupin (sister), who also specializes in storytellers. Kenny signs his pottery as: K.J. Sando, Jemez.

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place twice
- New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Storytellers and Figurative Pottery

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Myron SarracinoMyron Sarracino
Laguna

Myron Sarracino, “Kaa Ooa Dinn Naa”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born into the Laguna Pueblo in 1967. He began hand coiling pottery in 1984 at the age of 17.

Myron was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery by Verna Soloman (friend), Thelma and Sandy Sarracino, grandparents), and his friend and teacher, the famous, “Gladys Paquin”. She taught Myron all the fundamentals of traditional pottery making.

Myron specializes in hand coiled traditional pottery. Most of Myron’s designs originated from the Tularosa basin in southern New Mexico . These prehistoric swirl patterns along with various fine line work are his specialty. He duplicates ancient designs from old broken pottery shards found on ancient grounds. Myron uses all natural pigments to construct his high quality pottery. Myron signs his work as: Myron Sarracino, Laguna Pueblo.

Myron is also related to the following artists: Bertha Riley (aunt) and Stewart Riley, Jr.(cousin).

Awards:

-Eighth Northern Pueblo Indian
-1993 1st place Gallup Indian Ceremonials
-New Mexico State Fair (too many to list)
-Art and Craftsman Show
-Best in Traditional Pottery
-Others too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

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Sharon SarracinoSharon Sarracino
Jemez-Laguna

Sharon Sarracino was born in the early 1950’s. She is a full blooded Native American Indian. She is half Laguna and half Jemez. Sharon began her interest in pottery making when she was 18 years of age, in 1970. Ms. Sarracino was inspired to continue the family tradition of working with clay from her Grandmother, Petra Romero, who specialized in hand coiled pottery. Sharon specializes in hand coiling the contemporary designed handmade Jemez pottery. She gathers her materials from the grounds within the Jemez Pueblo.Sharon will normally construct a Butterfly Maiden, kachina, or a Corn Maiden kachina on the front of her pottery to add a unique touch to her art work. She has developed her own style on her art. She hand coils many shapes and sizes. Sharon signs her art as: S.Sarracino, Jemez. Sharon is related to the following artists: Florence Yepa, Genevieve Chinana (sisters), and Robert Sarracino (brother), who creates figures and carves stone sculptures.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-Best of show in Santa Monica
- New Mexico State Fair
-Others too numerous to list

Sharon has art displayed at the Hert Museum in Colorado Springs .

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Dee J. SetallaDee J. Setalla
Hopi-Tewa

Dee J. Setalla is a member of the Hopi-Tewa Reservation. He was born and raised in Snowbird Canyon Arizona , and is a member of the Bear Clan. Dee began experimenting with pottery at the age of 6. Dee learned the art of pottery making from his Mother, Pauline Setalla, and his Aunt, Eunice, “ Fawn “, Navasie, both well known Hopi potters. They taught him all the fundamentals of pottery making the traditional way.

Dee specializes in handmade traditional Hopi pottery. He gathers all his materials from within the Hopi Reservation. Dee paints traditional designs of birds, moths, butterflies, bear claws, clouds, and rain on his pottery. Natural pigments found within the Hopi Reservation also provide the colors used on his pottery. Dee uses the walpi polychrome yellow and beige with blushes, characteristic of Hopi pottery. Dee signs his pottery as: D.S., Hopi, followed by a bear paw symbol to denote his Clan origin.

Stetson Setalla (brother), Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie (aunt), Burel Naha (cousin), and Sylvia “Featherwoman” (cousin) are among some of the famous artists that Dee is related to.

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery
-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market, 1st place
- New Mexico State Fair

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Gwen “Aas-Ku-Mana” (Mustard Juice Girl) SetallaGwen “Aas-Ku-Mana” (Mustard Juice Girl) Setalla
Hopi

Gwen “Aas-Ku-Mana” (Mustard Juice Girl) Setalla was born into the Hopi Reservation in 1964. She is a member of the Bear Clan and a member of the Water Clan. Her mother, Pauline Setalla, shared with her the fundamentals of working with clay using ancient traditions. Gwen took an interest in working with clay at the age of 5. Pauline gave her a ball of clay to play with and Gwen would make bowls by pressing the clay against her elbows and knees. Pauline then shaped it and completed the process for her at that time. She gradually improved her skills as the years went by, learning how to shape, sand and polish the pottery. She also had to learn which hills provided the best materials to gather clay and other natural pigments. At the age of 16 she began to paint her own designs on her pottery and fire it on her own. According to Gwen, the whole process of working with the clay was a real challenge for her to do. At the age of 21 her desire to experiment with new techniques and different shapes of pottery developed. She began engraving and protruding figures on her pottery. She finds these techniques most enjoyable. However, they do requuire a lot of patience and a steady hand. When she is working with clay, Gwen is always reminded of what her parents taught her as a child. “When creating a pot, you bring it to life and you breath life into it, always treat it with the greatest respect.” She prays a silent prayer for every pot she creates and thanks all the great spirits for blessing her with this talent to continue a long lived legacy. She signs her pottery as: Aas-Ku-Mana, Hopi, followed by a Bear Paw to denote her Clan Origin. She also copyrights every piece she creates. Joy “Frogwoman Navasie (aunt), Eunice Navasie (aunt), Dee Setalla (brother), Charles Navasie (cousin), and Stetson Setalla (brother) are a few of the famous artists which share the same family line.

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place
-1999 Heritage Program Marketplace 1st Place
-1999 Heritage Program Marketplace 2nd Place
-Others too numerous to list

Publications:

-Art of the Hopi
-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies
-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery
-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

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Stetson SetallaStetson Setalla
Hopi-Tewa

Stetson Setalla, member of the Bear Clan, was born into the Hopi-Tewa Reservation in 1962. He is the grandson of the famous “Paqua Naha” who paved the way for elegant white slip Hopi pottery. Stetson was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making from his Mother, Pauline Setalla. He began making pottery at the age of 19, immediately after he graduated from High School. In the beginning, it was just a hobby for him, yet it paved a path for him to become a superb artist. The lucrative aspect of the business was also his inspiration to become an artist. He also gets a sense of serenity, self-worth, pride, and inner peace within his soul while making his pottery.

Stetson demonstrates wonderful pottery making skills with each pottery in which he coils. All of his pottery is made from Mother Earth. The clay is dug up within the grounds of the Hopi Reservation and natural vegetables and minerals are used for colors. He fires his pottery outdoors with sheep dung. When Stetson works on his pottery he clears his mind of all bad thoughts by concentrating and praying to his clay. According to him a clear mind and a good heart are among the essentials to making pottery. Stetson signs his pottery as S. Setalla, followed by a rain cloud symbol.

Stetson is related to many well known potters which include: Eunice “Fawn” Navasie (aunt), Dee Setalla (brother), Sylvia Naha (cousin), Burel Naha (uncle), Gwen Setalla (sister), and the famous Joy “Frogwoman” Navasie.

Publications:

-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery
-Hopi-Tewa Pottery 500 Artist Biographies
- Stetson has pottery displayed in several art museums and private collections
-Heard Museum in Phoenix , AZ
- Museum of Indian Arts & Cultures, Santa Fe , NM

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Charmae Shields-NatsewayCharmae Shields-Natseway
Acoma

Charmae Shields-Natseway is a full blooded Native American Indian, she is a member of the Yellow Corn Clan from the Acoma Pueblo. She was born in 1958 and has been working with clay art since 1977. She learned the art of working with clay from Dolores Sanchez, her grandmother, and Ethel Shields, her mother. They taught her all the fundamentals of constructing pottery using the ancient traditional method of hand coiling and pinching that has been passed down from generation to generation.

Charmae is noted for her superb quality of lidded pottery cylinders, boxes, and pyramids. She gathers her natural clays and slips from within the Acoma Pueblo. She breaks the clumps of clay down to a fine powder form and them mixes it with water and other natural pigments to a fine medium. Then, she begins to hand coil her vessels. When the raw formed vessels are dried she sands off the excess to give her vessels a smooth finish. She hand boils all her colors from natural plants and vegetation and begins to hand paint her designs. She signs her pottery as: Charmae Shields Natseway, Acoma , N.M. , followed by a corn stalk to denote her family origin.

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market numerous years
-New Mexico State Fair numerous years
- Gallup N.M. Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremony
- Phoenix Heard Museum Show

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Mary SmallMary Small
Jemez

Mary Small, “Kal-la-Tee”, (New Indian Basket), was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1945 to Seriaco and Perfectita Toya, all members of the Sun Clan. Mary learned the art of traditional pottery making by assisting her mother. Mary was schooled in the “old way” of pottery making, and has mastered the art of processing clay from the earth, hand coiling and then the outdoor firing. Mary and her husband experimented with natural paints to come up with her unique blue/gray slip and burnt red/orange designs. Mary prays to her pots at each stage of the clay process. She was quoted as saying, “When my pottery is finished they are blessed, they have power.” She believes they will bring good luck to all who purchase her pottery. Mary feels that Native Americans have a special responsibility to protect the larger society from its own lack of harmony with nature, and the best way to help is to continue being faithful to their heritage. She is also afraid of changes that may dilute the traditional ways of her people.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwest Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
- Santa Fe Visitor Guide 1998

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market, 1st place 1981
-Fine Arts Enterprises Show at Mesa Verde Co
-Eight Northern Pueblo Indian Arts show
-Heard Museum Shop Phoenix
-1999 Powwhatan Renape Nation Juried Indian Arts Festival 1st Place
-Others too numerous to list

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Stephanie C. RhoadesStephanie C. Rhoades
Cochiti

Stephanie C. Rhoades, “Snowflake Flower”, was born in 1931 into the Cochiti Pueblo. She was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by her Grandmother, Estephanita Herrera, who also made clay sculptures and coiled pottery. She has been making traditional storytellers and sculptures since 1977.

Snowflake Flower specializes in handmade storytellers and clay sculptures made from Mother Earth. She digs up her own red clay and white sand from a sacred ground within the Cochiti Pueblo. She then combines the sand with the clay and hand shapes all of her sculptures. Immediately after this process the pottery is then left out to dry, where upon, she sands off the rough edges with sand paper. She uses a natural white slip paint made from the red clay. Wild spinach provides the black colored paint used on her pottery. She fires her pottery the traditional way, outdoors, with cedar wood chips and manure. Snowflake Flower signs her pottery as: Snowflake Flower, Cochiti NM , followed by the title of the figurine.

Snowflake Flower is related to the following artists: Mary Martin (cousin), and Ada Suina (sister).

Awards:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-1998 Southwest Indian Art Show 2nd place

Publications:

-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery
- Pueblo Stories & Storytellers
-Collections of Southwestern Pottery
-The Pueblo Storyteller
-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

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Sharon “Butterfly or Turquoise” StevensSharon “Butterfly or Turquoise” Stevens
Acoma

Sharon “Butterfly or Turquoise” Stevens is a member of the Bear Clan. She was born into the Acoma Pueblo in 1960. Sharon was inspired to continue the long lived family tradition of making pottery from her grandmother, the late Lolita Garcia, and her mother, Rosita Stevens. Lolita and Rosita taught Sharon on the fundamentals of hand making traditional pottery, using the ancient methods of their ancestors. Sharon began experimenting with clay at the age of 15.

Sharon specializes in the hand coiled Acoma ollas. She gathers her clay and other natural pigments from within the grounds of the Acoma Pueblo. Then, she cleans the clay, mixes, hand coils, shapes, paints, and fires her pottery. She fashions a yucca stem into a brush and paints her pottery using the natural pigments she gathered along with her clay. Her favorite designs to paint are the turtleback (turtles are believed to bring you long life) and lizards designs (lizards are believed to bring good luck). She hand coils many shapes and sizes of pottery. Sharon likes working with the larger pottery because she can be more creative with designs. She signs her pottery as: S.L. Stevens, followed by a bear paw to denote her Clan origin.

Sharon is related to the following artists: Virginia Garcia (sister) and Manuel Stevens (brother).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

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Ron SuazoRon Suazo
Santa Clara

Ron Suazo is a full- blooded Native American Indian from the Santa Clara Pueblo. Ron’s pottery style comes from watching his mother; who taught Ron how to coil, polish, and fire his pottery. Ron created his designs from studying ancient pueblo styles and early designs from generations prior. He visited several museums and looked intently at the pottery created by the Ancient Pueblo Indians, and was deeply impressed. Ron decided to create his own style, but to call upon his studies of early and ancient designs. Ron’s style has become one of unique black polish and matte finish with feather designs, bear paws, and other early styles. Ron will add stones to his work such as turquoise, coral, and malachite. From the day Ron sparked an interest in pottery making, he hoped that his work would be unique and stand apart from all the others. It is believed that Ron has accomplished his goal. Every one of his pots are copy righted,therefore, every one is an original design.

Awards:

-1993 Eighth Northern Pueblos Arts and Crafts Show
-1994 Eighth Northern Pueblos Arts & Crafts Show
-1995 Heard Museum Art Show in Phoenix AZ Honorable mention
-1999 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place
-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition
- Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

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Emily Suazo-TafoyaEmily Suazo-Tafoya
Kiowa/ Santa Clara

Emily Suazo-Tafoya is a full blooded Native American Indian born in 1959. She is Kiowa and Santa Clara . She was inspired to learn the art of pottery making from several family members, including her Grandmother, Clara Suazo. Emily has been making pottery since 1973.

Emily specializes in the handmade and handcrafted incised (sgrafitto) Santa Clara Pueblo pottery. Her pottery is made the traditional way and then completely covered with contemporary designs. Emily digs her clay from the local hills then combines it with volcanic ash found in the Espanola Valley of northern New Mexico . The pottery is carefully formed and a clay slip is applied in layers. The pottery is then polished to a high sheen. The firing techniques bring out the desired colors like black, red, or green. The pottery is then painstakingly etched. Every one of her pots has its own distinct personality, whether it be of the human or wildlife design. It’s important to Emily that she produces a clean and sharp image on every pot she makes. The result is a “sparkling pottery gem”, prized by collectors the world over. Emily stated that: “It is important to me to share my unique style of contemporary pottery. It is also important to stay within traditional methods of potting.” Emily signs her pottery as: Snow-Cap Mountains , Emily Tafoya, SCP .

Emily is related to the following artists: Jennifer Tafoya (daughter) and the late Ray Tafoya (husband).

Awards:

-1997 Gallup Ceremonial 2nd Place
-1998 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place
-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place

Publications:

-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition
- Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

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Dena SuinaDena Suina
Cochiti/SanFelipe

Dena Suina is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1961 into the San Felipe Pueblo. Dena married into the pueblo of Cochiti in the 1980’s. She sparked an interest in sculpting clay figures while observing her mother-in-law, Louise Suina, hand coil and hand paint her beautiful clay sculptures. Louise taught Dena all the fundamentals of how to hand coil all types of sculptures using traditional methods. Dena has been working with clay art since 1991.

Dena specializes in handmade and hand painted contemporary storytellers. Dena’s unique style of storytellers is of a traditional Cochiti storyteller, but with crisp detailed lines, very small children and exquisite painting. Her sculptures are all hand coiled, hand pinched, and hand painted. She makes a wide variety of sizes and adds very intricate detail to her clay sculptures. Dena has established herself as a fine artisan and continues to amaze collectors with her intricate efforts. She signs her pottery as: Dena M. Suina, Cochiti/San Felipe Pueblo, N.M.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place
-1999 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place
-Gallup Ceremonial 2nd place
- New Mexico State Fair 1st, 2nd and 3rd in various years

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Vangie SuinaVangie Suina
Cochiti

Vangie Suina is a full blooded Native American Indian, she was born in the mid-sixties into the Cochiti Pueblo. Louise Suina, who is her mother, taught her all the fundamentals of working with pottery artforms, from mixing the clay to hand building the dolls using the ancient traditional hand coiling method, which has been passed down through several generations of their people. Vangie has been working with clay art since the age of 22. She chose to become an artisan so that she could spend more time at home with her children, husband, and it allows her to contribute her unique style of art to the long lived legacy of her people.

Vangie specializes in contemporary storytellers, turtles, and drums. Vangie gathers her raw materials from within the Cochiti Pueblo. She soaks her clay and later mixes it with sand to temper it. When the clay reaches the perfect consistency it is hand formed into a storyteller figurine. Then, she sets her figures out to dry, the drying process is a very delicate state in the making. Vangie needs to keep checking her pieces so that they don’t crack and if they begin cracking in the early stages she can easily repair and add more clay. Once the figures are dry she places them on a grill outdoors with manure cakes placed on top in an igloo fashion begins the baking process which lasts about 2 hours depending on the size of the figures. When the baking process is complete, she allows her pieces to cool down thoroughly and she begins to hand paint them. She like to paint her figures after the baking process because it allows her to decorate her art in vivid contemporary hues and thus gives her a unique style all her own. She signs her pottery as Vangie Suina, Cochiti.

Vangie is related to: Anthony Suina (husband), Dena Suina (sister-in-law), and Louise Suina (mother).

Awards:

- Santa Fe Indian Market
- New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwest Art Magazine June 1983
-Santa fean Magazine August 1983
-Santa Fean Magazine December 1987
-The Pueblo Storyteller

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