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Louis & Nadine Mansfield
Acoma
Louis & Nadine Mansfield
Louis & Nadine Mansfield are full blooded Native American Indians from the Laguna Pueblo and the Acoma Pueblo. Louis was born in 1967 and Nadine was born in 1968. They were taught the fundamentals of pottery making from several different artists, including Betty Ramirez-Concho (mother). The continuance of family traditions is extremely important to these fine artists. Nadine was 17 years of age when her interest in pottery making evolved. She would assist other artisans with their work and Nadine learned several different methods of the clay process.

Louis & Nadine specialize in handmade pottery. They both assist each other in every aspect of working with the clay. They gather natural pigments found within the Acoma Pueblo. They clean, mix, coil, shape, paint, and fire their pottery in a kiln. One of their trademarks is the lizards climbing all over the pottery. The lizards represent good luck and a long life. They make a wide variety of sizes, shapes, and paint intricate traditional patterns. They sign their pottery as: Louis, Nadine Mansfield, Acoma .

Awards:

-1997 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place
-1998 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place

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Alice MartinezAlice & Ruben Martinez
San Ildefonso


Alice Martinez and her son, Ruben have formed a partnership with pottery making. They are from the Pueblo of San Ildefonso/Tewa. Alice is now in her seventies, and has been making pottery since she was twenty years old. Alice was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of hand coiling pottery from her parents, Richard and Lucy Martinez. Ruben learned the fundamentals of pottery making from his mother and now they have joined forces and combined their efforts to make some of the finest black on black pottery available today.

Over the last fifty years, Alice and Ruben have perfected the Tunyo Polychrome mate on polished black style pottery that the Martinez family from San Ildefonso had become famous for back in the early 1900’s. They make pottery the traditional way; they gather the clay from sacred grounds within the San Ildefonso Pueblo, clean the clay,hand coil, shape, and fire the traditional way, outdoors, with horse manure.

Alice ’s father, Richard Martinez was the adopted son of the famous Maria Martinez.

Awards:

-Eight Northern Pueblos Exhibit
- Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

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Barbara Martinez Barbara Martinez
Santa Clara-Tewa

Barbara Martinez “Jo-Povi”, Cactus Flower, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Pueblo of Santa Clara-Tewa, in 1947. Barbara was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from her Mother, Flora Narranjo. Barbara began making pottery in 1965, when she was 18 years old.

Barbara specializes in the traditional handmade black and red carved Santa Clara pottery. She gathers her own clay from within the hills of the Santa Clara Pueblo. She cleans, mixes, hand coils, shapes, carves, and fires the pottery, outdoors. Barbara’s favorite piece to carve is the tall vase with the water serpent and carved feather designs. Barbara signs her pottery as Barbara Martinez, Santa Clara Pueblo. Barbara is related to the following artists: Vickie Martinez (daughter), Chris Martinez, Manuel Martinez, Sammy Naranjo (sons), and Glenda Naranjo (sister).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

- Santa Clara Pottery Today
- Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

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Vickie MartinezVickie Martinez
Santa Clara-Tewa

Vickie Martinez “Koe-Sawe”, Buffalo Steps, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Pueblo of Santa Clara-Tewa in 1967. Vickie was inspired to continue the long lived tradition of her ancestors of working with clay from her Mother, Barbara Martinez. She has been making pottery since 1983, when she was 15 years old.

Vickie specializes in the traditional handmade black and red Santa Clara pottery. She gathers her own natural pigments (clay) from the hills within the Santa Clara Pueblo. Vickie clean, mixes, hand coils, shapes, carves, the pottery, fires, and polishes her pottery. Vickie was quoted as saying: “I find etching a very challenging and rewarding experience, which I am enjoying thoroughly.” Vickie signs her pottery as: Vickie Martinez, Santa Clara Pueblo.

Vickie is related to the following artists: Barbara Martinez (mother), Glenda Naranjo, Frances Salazar (aunts), Sammy Naranjo, Chris Martinez and Manuel Martinez (brothers).

Awards:

-Eighth Northern 2nd place
-New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

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Elizabeth Medina Elizabeth Medina
Zia

Elizabeth Medina, “Sepia”, was born in 1956 into the Jemez Pueblo. She married into the Zia Pueblo. She was inspired by her Mother-in-Law, Sofia Medina, to learn the art of working with clay. Elizabeth observed Sofia with much enthusiasm in hopes of achieving the same skills. It appears from what Elizabeth has accomplished, that she has achieved her goal.

Elizabeth specializes in the handmadetraditional Zia pottery with traditional symbols and birds. She digs up her own clay, cleans, mixes, coils, shapes, fires, and paints her pottery the traditional way, with natural colors. Elizabeth signs her pottery as: Elizabeth Medina, Zia. Elizabeth is related to the following artists: Marcellus Medina (husband), Lois Medina (sister-in-law), and Sofia Medina (mother-in-law).

Awards:

- Santa Fe Indian Market
-Eighth Northern Arts and Crafts Show
- Colorado Indian Art Show
-Other awards too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Talking With The Clay
-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

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Marcellus Medina Marcellus Medina
Zia

Marcellus Medina was born into the Zia Pueblo in 1954. He was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by his ancestors, the support of many people, creative inspiration, and economic motivation.

Marcellus is a painter from Zia Pueblo. He paints traditional and contemporary images in watercolors and acrylics. He is a self taught painter and has been painting since the age of 10. He has devoted the majority of his life to being an art student and currently is still a practicing artist. Marcellus signs his pottery as: Medina , year, and accents it with a zia bird symbol, Marcellus is related to the following artists: Elizabeth Medina (spouse), Sofia Medina (mother), and Lois Medina (sister).

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st Place
-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 3rd Place
-Santa Fe Indian Market several awards
- New Mexico State Fair Best of Show
-Southwest Indian Painting Convocation
-Others awards too numerous to list

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery
-American Indian Pottery
-Talking With The Clay
-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition
-Others too numerous to list

Displayed permanent collections:

- Albuquerque International Airport , Alb. NM
- Boston Museum of Fine Art, Boston MA
- School of American Research, Santa Fe NM

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Sofia Medina and Lois MedinaSofia Medina and Lois Medina
Zia

Sofia Medina and Lois Medina are a mother and daughter team which with combined efforts produce some of the finest Zia Pueblo pottery around today. Sofia was born in 1932 and Lois was born in 1959. Sofia has been making pottery since 1963. Trinidad Medina, who was a prolific and one of Zia’s finest potter’s, taught her all the fundamentals of making traditional Zia pottery and encouraged her to continue the long lived family tradition of hand coiling pottery.

Sofia and Lois specialize in making hand coiled Zia pottery just like their ancestors before them. All the materials used on their pottery come from within the Zia Pueblo. The clay is gathered from the grounds within the pueblo. They clean, mix, hand coil, shape, paint, and fire the pottery the traditional way, outdoors. The colors are derived from natural plant life and minerals also found within the Zia Pueblo. They both contribute equally while constructing their pottery. Trinidad encouraged Sofia to teach each and every one of her children the art of hand coiling traditional Zia pottery, so they may be able to contribute to the legacy which is bestowed upon them as well. Sofia & Lois said, “Spiritually, making pottery eases your mind, and we sing and pray while making our pottery.” They sign their pottery as: Sofia Medina-Lois Medina, Zia.

They are related to Marcellus Medina and Herman Medina (sons/brothers).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Fourteen Families in Pueblo Pottery
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Talking with the Clay

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market
-New Mexico State Fair
-Eighth Northern Arts & Crafts Show

Collections:

-Albuquerque International Airport
-Smithsonian in Washington , D.C.

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West MountainWest Mountain
Laguna/Cochiti

West Mountain is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1975 and is a member of the Lizard Clan. He is half Laguna Pueblo and half Cochiti Pueblo. West is extremely proud of his heritage and participates in the traditions and ceremonies of his people. He was inspired to learn the art of working with pottery from several family members and various friends. He comes from a family that reinforces the traditional ways of their ancestors. Art has always come naturally to West. When he was a young boy he drew many kachinas and fine line designs on paper. Eventually, he got the idea to put his work on pottery. This developed and improved his drawing skills and techniques. He has been crafting pottery since 1998.

West Mountain specializes in hand crafting Santa Clara pottery. He draws sgraffito designs of highly respected kachinas on his pottery. West uses his steady hand to etch his finely detailed warriors, maidens, and fine line designs of a time when life seemed so much more simple.Then, he accents his pottery with quality turquoise stones to add a unique flare to his art. West is in the early stages of establishing himself as an fine artisan, and he is very proud of this accomplishments to date. His favorite kachina to create is the Poli Kachina, other wise known as the Butterfly Kachina, because of the special dances they perform and their beauty. There is over 300 recognized Kachinas and they represent different spiritual beings that are believed to guide Native American People on the right path of life. He signs his pottery as: West Mountain , Laguna , N.M.

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place
-2000 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place
-2001 New Mexico State Fair 1st Place
-2001 New Mexico State Fair 3rd Place
-2001 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

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