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Carmel Lewis Carmel Lewis
Acoma

Carmel Lewis was born in 1947 into the Acoma Sky City Pueblo. She is one of the daughters of the world renowned late, Lucy M. Lewis. Lucy was Carmels biggest inspiration for learning the ancient traditional methods of working with natural handmade pottery. Carmel gathers her clay from the pits within the Acoma Pueblo. She cleans her clay by hand to purify the natural ingredients that mother earth has provided her with. She hand mixes, hand coils, and hand paints her pottery using the ancient traditional outdoor firing techniques. Her unique hand painted designs are replicated from tradition symbols found on ancient pottery sherds. Lucy was the driving force behind the revival of pottery making as an art in the pueblo of Acoma . The Lewis family keeps the same patterns and does not move to a contemporary style because it is very important to them to keep alive true traditions and designs of the ancient mimbres people alive. Some of the of these designs which are replicated are the deer pot, lighting bolt pattern, and the many variations of the mimbres patterns. She is related to Emma Lewis-Mitchell, Dolores Lewis-Garcia (sisters), and Drew Lewis (brother).

Publications:

There are numerous books referencing Lucy M. Lewis and her daughters, they can be found in:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Fourteen Families in pueblo pottery
-Southwestern pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Talking with the Clay
-American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition
-Seven Families in Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market Various 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Place numerous years
-Eight Northern 1st various years
-Heard Museum show
- New Mexico State Fair
-Others received too many to list

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Diane Lewis Diane Lewis
Acoma

Diane Lewis was born in 1960 and is a member of the Lewis family from the Acoma Pueblo (no relation to Lucy Lewis, but a family famous for pottery artists just the same). Each member of this fine family of proven artists are exquisite painters. They are well known for fine handmade pottery, storytellers and clay sculptures. Diane began experimenting with the art of working with clay, and at the age of 21 she mastered the craft of hand coiling pottery using natural pigments and focused more on the rules of the ancient traditional methods of firing outdoors.

Diane specializes in handmade seed jars, small bowls with mimbres and traditional designs. She paints with soft but crisp colors using natural paints applied with a brush fashioned from the stems of a yucca plant. She gathers her natural pigments from within the Acoma Pueblo. Diane signs her pottery as: Diane Lewis, Acoma , N.M. She is related to Marilyn Lewis-Ray, Judy Lewis, Carolyn Lewis-Concho (sisters), and Kathleen Lewis (mother).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Collections of Southwestern Pottery
-Miniature Arts of the Southwest

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 2nd Place
-Eight Northern Pueblos Exhibit 1st, 2nd & 3rd
-Santa Fe Indian Market 1st, 2nd & 3rd various

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Andrew LewisAndrew Lewis
Acoma

Andrew Lewis is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1927 into the Acoma Pueblo. He was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from his mother, the famed late Lucy Lewis. She taught Drew all the fundamentals of working with clay using the ancient traditional methods that were passed down to her from her ancestors from generation to generation. When Drew was a young child only women were responsible for constructing pottery vessels, however, one day he decided he wanted to learn the methods and construct pottery of his own.

Drew specializes in hand coiled and hand painted traditional pottery vessels. He gathers his raw clumps of clay, sand, and harvests his natural plants which he uses to boil his colors with from within the Acoma Pueblo. He breaks the clumps of clay down to a fine powder form and sifts the powder for impurities. He hand mixes the powder with water and sand to temper the clay. Once that is done, he begins to roll out his clay into snake like coils and begins building his vessels for the desired shape. When he is finished building the vessel he sets it out to dry. Once it is dry he sands his vessel for a smooth finish and prepares it for painting. His colors are all boiled from natural plants and slips that Mother Earth has provided for him. He begins painting with a stem of a yucca plant that has been fashioned into a brush. His designs are all the traditional mimbres designs and parrot motifs that his ancestors painted many years prior to his birth. Finally, he fires his pottery the traditional way, outdoors. He signs his pottery as: Drew Lewis, Acoma , N.M. He is related to: Andrew Lewis, Jr., Theodore Lewis (sons), Ivan Lewis (brother), Carmel Lewis, Ann Lewis, Emma Lewis-Mitchell, Delores Lewis-Garcia, and Mary Lewis-Garcia (sisters).

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Fourteen Families In Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

- Santa Fe Indian Market
- New Mexico State Fair

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Judy LewisJudy Lewis
Acoma

Judy Lewis is a full blooded Native American Indian from the Pueblo of Acoma and she was born in 1966. She has been making pottery since 1986. Judy was inspired to continue the family tradition of clay sculpting by observing her many of her family members. She was especially motivated by the passion and ambition that her sister, Marilyn Ray-Lewis, showed towards working with clay, and the assistance that she gave to her. Judy hand coils pottery, vases, and storytellers using the methods of her ancestors. She only uses natural pigments for clay and paints. Judy has developed a style of her own. She hand pinches and hand coils a contemporary shape with traditional designs and colors. As with the entire family the colors have a crisp but soft pastel look to them. Judy is related to the following artists: Kathy Lewis (mother), Carolyn Concho Lewis (sister), and Sharon Lewis (sister). She signs her art work as Judy Lewis, Acoma , N.M.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

Awards:

- Santa Fe Indian Market
- Gallup Indian Ceremonial Show
-Eighth Northern Pueblos Exhibit

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Sharon Lewis Sharon Lewis
Acoma

Sharon Lewis is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1959 and is a member of the Red Corn Clan from the Acoma Pueblo. Sharon was inspired to continue the long lived family tradition of hand coiling pottery by Marilyn Ray and other family members. They taught Sharon all the fundamentals of making pottery using traditional methods. The lucrative aspect of the business also inspired Sharon in the early years. Sharon has been working with clay since 1978.

Sharon specializes in hand coiled miniature seed pots. She gathers her natural clay and other pigments from within the Acoma Pueblo. The clay is cleaned, mixed, shaped, sanded, painted, and fired outdoors. Her designs are animals, kokopelli’s, mimbres designs, and various geometric or fine line designs. She sometimes collaborates with her husband and they make pottery together. She is related to Diane Lewis, Carolyn Lewis, Judy Lewis, Rebecca Lucario (sisters-in-law), and Bernard E. Lewis (husband). Sharon signs her pottery as: Sharon Lewis, Acoma , followed by a corn symbol to denote her clan origin.

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Collections of Southwestern Pottery
-Southwestern Pottery 1999 Edition

Awards:

-1999 Santa Fe Indian Market 1st and 2nd
-Eighth Northern Pueblos Exhibit
- New Mexico State Fair
-Red Earth Show 1995 1st place

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Travis and Rosemary Lewis Travis and Rosemary Lewis
Satan Clara- Tewa/ Pima

Travis and Rosemary Lewis are full blooded Native Americans born into the Santa Clara-Tewa/Pima Pueblo. Travis was born in 1951 and Rosemary was born in 1952. Rosemary began experimenting with pottery at the age of 9. She was inspired to learn the pottery making process from her Mother, Olaria Sisneros. Travis was inspired by Mary Cain, who is also is a famous potter from the Santa Clara Pueblo. They also were economically motivated to continue the family tradition of pottery making.

Travis and Rosemary specialize in the traditional black Santa Clara hand coiled and etched pottery, featuring kokopelli. They both participate in all procedures of the pottery making process. They dig up the clay from a sacred ground within the Santa Clara Pueblo. There is several different stages involved in order to prepare the clay to begin shaping into pottery. They mix, hand coil, shape, etch, and fire the pottery the traditional way, outdoors. They enjoy etching kokopelli (the flute player) on their pottery. They sign their pottery as Rose M. Lewis, Santa Clara Pueblo, followed by the letter T incorporated into a letter L. Travis and Rosemary are related to many other famous potters, among them are Geraldine Naranjo and Kevin Naranjo (cousins).

Awards:

-None to date

Publications:

- Pueblo Indian Pottery 750 Artist Biographies

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Dolores Lewis Dolores Lewis
Acoma

Dolores Lewis was born in 1938 into the Acoma Sky City Pueblo. She is one of the daughters of the world renowned late, Lucy M. Lewis. Dolores has been around great pottery artists her whole life, however, her greatest inspiration came down from her mother, Lucy. Dolores was a self taught artisan, she learned the ancient traditional methods of working with clay by carefully observing Lucy construct her beautiful pottery vessels. Dolores chose to continue the long lived tradition of working with pottery, and using the ancient methods passed down to her from her grandmothers because of the importance to keep her peoples traditions alive. Dolores gathers her own natural pigments and clays from the clay pits within the Acoma Pueblo. She cleans her clay for impurities by hand, then, she hand mixes, hand coils, hand paints, and uses a traditional firing method to add the finishing touch to her wonderful masterpieces which mother earth has blessed her with. The Lewis family keeps the same patterns and does not move to a contemporary style because it is very important to them to keep alive true traditions and designs of the ancient mimbres people alive. Some of these designs which are replicated are the deer with a heartline, lightning bolt pattern, and the many variations of the mimbres patterns. Lucy was the driving force behind the revival of pottery making as an art in the Pueblo of the Acoma . Dolores is also related to Emma Lewis-Mitchell, Carmel Lewis (sisters), and Drew Lewis (brother).

Publications:

There are many books on Lucy M. Lewis and her daughters, information on these fine artisans can be found in:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Fourteen Families in pueblo pottery
-Southwestern pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Talking with the Clay
-American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition
-Seven Families in Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market Various 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Place numerous years
-Eight Northern 1st various years
-Heard Museum show
- New Mexico State Fair
-Others received too many to list

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Emma Lewis-Mitchell Emma Lewis-Mitchell
Acoma

Emma Lewis-Mitchell was born in 1931 into the Acoma Sky City Pueblo. She is one of the daughters of the world renowned late, Lucy M. Lewis. Emma was around great pottery artists her whole life, however, her greatest inspiration came down from her mother, Lucy. Emma was a self taught artisan, she learned the ancient traditional methods of working with clay by carefully observing Lucy construct her beautiful pottery vessels. Emma chose to continue the long lived tradition of working with pottery, and using the ancient methods passed down to her from her grandmothers because of the importance to keep her peoples traditions alive. Emma gathers her own natural pigments and clays from the clay pits within the Acoma Pueblo. She cleans her clay for impurities by hand, then, she hand mixes, hand coils, hand paints, and uses a traditional firing method to add the finishing touch to her wonderful masterpieces which mother earth has blessed her with. The Lewis family keeps the same patterns and does not move to a contemporary style because it is very important to them to keep alive true traditions and designs of the ancient mimbres people alive. Some of these designs which are replicated are the deer with a heartline, lightning bolt pattern, and the many variations of the mimbres patterns. Lucy was the driving force behind the revival of pottery making as an art in the Pueblo of the Acoma . Emma is also related to Dolores Lewis-Garcia, Carmel Lewis (sisters), and Drew Lewis (brother).

Publications:

There are many books on Lucy M. Lewis and her daughters, information on these fine artisans can be found in:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Fourteen Families in pueblo pottery
-Southwestern pottery Anasazi to Zuni
-Talking with the Clay
-American Indian Pottery 2nd Edition
-Seven Families in Pueblo Pottery

Awards:

-Santa Fe Indian Market Various 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Place numerous years
-Eight Northern 1st various years
-Heard Museum show
- New Mexico State Fair
-Others received too many to list

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Fannie Loretto Fannie Loretto
Jemez/Laguna

Fannie Loretto, “Little Turqoise”, was born in 1951. She is half Jemez and half Laguna, She is a member of the water clan. She began making pottery at the age of 16. Fannie has been hand coiling clay sculptures and masks for over 10 years, prior to that she madehand several shapes of hand coiled pottery using traditional ancient methods which were passed down to her from several members in her family.

Fannie was inspired to learn the art of working with clay by assisting her mother, Carrie Reid Loretto make her pottery., Carrie specialized in hand coiled pottery. Fannie gathers all her natural pigments from within the Jemez Pueblo. Then, she grinds, cleans, mixes the clay, hand pinches, shapes, paints, and fires her art, outdoors the traditional way. Fannie stated that: “the masks are my favorite to create because it’s like drawing in 3-D, when I make them.” Fannie is well known for her koshari masks, and she makes them in several different sizes and adds ribbons, feathers, horse hair, and corn husks to compliment her art. She signs her pottery as: Fannie Loretto, followed by the water sign to denote her Clan origin.

Fannie is also related to the following artists: Dorothy Trujillo, Alma Concho, Lenora Lucero, Marie Coriz and the late Mary Toya.

Awards:

-Eighth Northern 1978 1st place
-La Luz in NM 1st and 2nd
-New Mexico State Fair 1st place 1993-1998
-Santa Fe Indian Market 1999 1st place
-Several others too numerous to mention

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Nacimientos by Guy & Doris Monthan
-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

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Alma Loretto (Concha) MaestasAlma Loretto (Concha) Maestas
Jemez/Laguna

Alma Loretto (Concha) Maestas, “Painted Parrot”, member of the Water Clan was born in 1941. She is half Jemez and half Laguna. She was inspired to continue the tradition of pottery making by her Mother, Carrie Reid Loretto. Alma was introduced into pottery making at the age of 7. Alma specializes in handmade Jemez Pueblo clay figurines, storytellers, koshares, nativity’s, and can also hand coil traditional pottery. She began experimenting with clay and decided that she enjoyed making figurines most. She paints with natural colors and fires her pottery the traditional way. Alma currently signs her pottery as: ALMA , followed by a water symbol to denote her clan origin. Alma is also related to the following artists: Dorothy, Lupe, Edna, Fannie, Josephine, and the late Mary Loretto, all sisters.

Awards:

-ENIPC Artists and Craftsman Show 1st
-Eighth Northern Indian Pueblos

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-The Pueblo Storyteller
-Nacimientos
-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery
- Pueblo Stories and Storytellers
-Featured in National Geographic May 1982

Permanent Collections:

- Smithsonian Museum
- Plymouth Historical Society Museum
-Sipapu Gallery, Plymouth MI
- Other awards, publications and permanent collections too numerous to list

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Angie Loretto-Riley Angie Loretto-Riley
Jemez

Angie Loretto-Riley, is a full blooded Native American Indian, born into the Pueblo of the Jemez, in 1955. Angie was inspired to learn the art of working with clay by her mother, Lenora Gachupin, at the age of 12, she was taught where to gather the clay, how to mix it, hand coil, paint, and finally, how to fire the pottery, shortly after that she began experimenting with clay and hand making little pots and gradually began making storytellers.

Angie specializes in handmade storytellers but does not limit her abilities to only do that, she also hand coils friendship pots. She enjoys making the larger storytellers, because she likes the challenge, of putting as many babies on the doll, as she can fit onto it. She signs her pottery as Angie Loretto, Jemez.

Angie is related to the following artists: Lucy Toya, Bea Riley (sisters), Felecia Loretto, and Anita Cajero (nieces).

Awards:

- None to date

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

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Corrine and Gary Louis
Acoma
Corrine and Gary Louis

Corrine and Gary Louis (husband) are both from the Pueblo of Acoma, also called the Sky City . Corrine was first introduced to pottery making at a young age by her Grandmother,Marie Z. Chino, Mother, Carrie Chino-Charlie, respectively. The family has been known for pottery making for many years. Corrine and Gary are carrying on the family tradition of working with pottery. Corrine and Gary first came across the idea of using horse hair on their pottery, after Corrine pulled out a recently fired batch of pottery, when one of her own strands of hair fell on the pottery and scorched the pot. It was from this accident that the idea of using such a method to decorate pottery was invented, therefore, Gary and Corrine are credited with this style of pottery. There were many trial and errors that took place over several years, until they mastered the art of what is now called “ Horse Hair Pottery.“ Gary will also etch on the pottery to create an even greater contrast and style to the horse hair pottery.. Gary and Corrine can and do other traditional styles of Acoma pottery, but since horse hair has become so popular, they have devoted a great deal of their time doing only this style.

Awards:

- New Mexico State Fair

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

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Irvin Louis Irvin Louis
Acoma

Irvin Louis is a full blooded Native American Indian. He was born in 1955 into the Acoma Pueblo. He is a member of the Yellow Corn Clan, and was given the Indian name of “Vines of the Melons”. Irvin was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from his ancestors. Continuing long lived traditions is extremely important to him and his people. He began working with clay at the age of 14. He was taught all the fundamentals of hand coiling traditional pottery, using the ancient methods past down to him from his family members. Irvin working with art because of the wide range of people which he encounters. He shares techniques and gives other artisans suggestions as well as welcomes opinions of others.

Irvin now specializes in working with contemporary pottery. He learned the art of making horse-hair pottery. He pours a ceramic white slip substance into a mold and then, he pours out the excess slip and allows the slip to dry. The ceramicware is then cleaned and polished. He heats up the pottery in a kiln and then randomly tosses authentic hair taken from the mane (thin lines) or the tail (thick lines) of a horse on the heated pottery. The resulting carbon being drawn into the surface of the pottery creates the wonderful designs and patterns. Finally, he cleans up the finished pottery with a dry material and th finished product is a unique marblized flare styled pot. This process of constructing art is very hazardous and time consuming. He signs his pottery as: Irvin J. Louis, Acoma .

 

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Arthur LucarioArthur Lucario
Acoma/Laguna

Arthur Lucario was born in 1942. He is half Acoma and half Laguna. He started out as a silver smith, where he made jewelry and eventually learned how to craft pottery and hand carve Hopi style kachinas. He was inspired to craft pottery by his sister, Sally Garcia.

Arthur specializes in the hand etched ceramic pottery with the red and black etchings. Arthur also carves kachinas on cotton woodroot. He paints on the colors and then crafts his designs on the pottery. He crafts a wide variety of shapes and sizes. He doesn’t use stencils at all. He draws his designs on the greenware and then etches his pottery. His wife, Velma Lucario will often help Arthur with his art. Arthur signs his pottery as: R&V Lucario, Laguna.

Awards:

-1995 New Mexico State Fair 1st place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies

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Raymond “Ray“ J. LucarioRaymond “Ray“ J. Lucario

Laguna

Raymond “Ray“ J. Lucario is a full blooded Native American Indian who was born into the Laguna Pueblo in 1971. Ray was given the Indian name of Sunrise at a young age. Ray was inspired to learn the art of hand carving kachina dolls on cottonwood root by the admiration he had for Hopi artist’s work. He began experimenting with wood at the age of 16, and has continued to perfect his carvings since that time. His family and friends encouraged him to learn some sort of art so that he may add to a long lived legacy of Native American Indians. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key roll in his decision to become an artist.

Ray hand carves cottonwood root into magnificent full bodied kachina dolls with a simple tool, like a pocket knife. His dolls are carved with extreme precision and detail. He applies acrylic paints to his dolls and paints them very carefully because it is essential to represent the kachina’s as accurately as possible. Ray signs his dolls as: R. Lucario, Laguna.

Ray is related to the following artists: Arthur Lucario (father) and Sally Garcia (aunt).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair various years

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Mary I. LuceroMary I. Lucero
Jemez

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Mary R. Lucero Mary R. Lucero
Jemez

Mary R. Lucero is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Jemez Pueblo in 1948. Mary was inspired to learn the art of working with clay by her Grandmother, Magnita Lucero. Magnita introduced Mary to the hills that provided the best clay. Then, Mary gathers other natural pigments from the sacred grounds within the Jemez pueblo. Magnita taught Mary how to mix, shape, paint, and fire pottery the traditional way, outdoors. She began hand coiling her pottery at the age of 14, when she would watch her grandmother make her pottery the traditional way.

Mary specializes in the handmade pueblo styled storytellers, but does not limit her abilities. She also makes animals, nativity’s and other clay sculptures. Mary uses natural colors to paint her pottery. Mary signs her pottery as: Mary R. Lucero, Jemez.

Mary is related to the following artists: Carol Gachupin (sister), Mary I. Lucero (cousin), Diane Lucero, and Joyce Lucero (daughters).

Awards:

-1999 New Mexico State Fair 4th Place
-Jemez Red Rock Art Show 2nd place

Publications:

-Southwestern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni

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Virginia A. Lucero Virginia A. Lucero
Jemez

Virginia A. Lucero, member of the Fire Clan, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born in 1964 into the Jemez Pueblo. Virginia was inspired to learn the art of working with clay from her friend, Marie Romero, who comes from a long line of famous pottery artisans. Marie taught Virginia all the fundamentals of working with clay using ancient traditional methods. Marie also shared special techniques to make her tasks easier. Virginia began experimenting with clay at the age of 14. The lucrative aspect of the business also played a key role in her becoming an artist.

Virginia specializes in handmade storytellers. She gathers her clay from the hills within the Jemez Pueblo. She soaks the clay, hand grinds the clay, cleans the clay for imperfections, hand mixes, hand coils, hand shapes, and sands the sculpture by hand. Then, Virginia hand paints her finished products and fires her sculptures, outdoors, with cedar chips. The colors Virginia uses to paint her storytellers are boiled together from natural pigments and minerals also found within the Jemez Pueblo. She accents her sculptures with pieces of miniature pottery, painted jewelry, and toys. She signs her sculptures as: V. Lucero, Jemez, followed by a rain cloud. She is related to the following artists: Carol Lucero-Gachupin, Mary Rose Lucero (cousins), and Mary I. Lucero (sister).

Awards:

-None to date

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Carol Lucero-Gachupin
Jemez
Carol Lucero-Gachupin

Carol Lucero-Gachupin, is a full blooded Native American Indian. She was born into the Pueblo of the Jemez, in 1958. Carol was inspired to learn the art of hand coiling pottery by Marie Romero, who is well known for making pottery and storytellers.

Carol specializes in the Navajo/Hopi, handmade butterfly storytellers. Her styles of storytellers have a nice blanket wrapped around the dolls, or she will make them with a flared skirt. Carol gathers and sifts her own clays and hand shapes them to her liking, and then fires her figures, outdoors, the traditional way. Carol was quoted as saying: “I love making storytellers because, it reminds me of my grandparents telling us stories when we were growing up.” She signs her storytellers as: Lucero-Gachupin followed by a kiva step symbol. Carol is related to the following artists: Marie Romero, Mary Lucero, and Diane Lucero.

Awards:

-2000 New Mexico State Fair 2nd Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-Collections of Southwestern Pottery

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Leonora Lupe Lucero-LorettoLeonora Lupe Lucero-Loretto
Jemez/Laguna 

Leonora Lupe Lucero-Loretto, “Sun Flower”, is a full blooded Native American Indian. Lupe was born in 1943. She is half Jemez and half Laguna. She began making her pottery sculptures at the age of 34. Lupe was inspired to make pottery by her sister, Dorothy Trujillo.

Lupe specializes in the handmade humorous Koshari storytellers, but does not limit herself to that. She also hand coils nativity's and other clay sculptures. She gathers her own clay, sand, and other natural pigments from the hills within the Jemez pueblo, then, she cleans the clay, mixes sand with clay together, and begins to hand coil her sculptures. Lupe also paints her art with the natural colors that she hand mixes as well, and finally, she fires her art the traditional way, outdoors. She add corn stalks to add a bit of flare to her work. Lupe signs her pottery as: L Lupe L Lucero.

Lupe is also related to the following artists: Alma Concho, Marie Loretto, Fannie Loretto, and the late Mary Toya (all sisters).

Awards:

-New Mexico State Fair 1st Place

Publications:

-Southern Pueblo Pottery 2,000 Artist Biographies
-The Pueblo Storyteller
-Storytellers and Other Figurative Pottery

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S | T | U | V | W | XYZ
 
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